California Employment Law Update
Pietro Deserio

Pietro Deserio

Associate

Pietro Deserio is an associate in the Labor & Employment Law Department. He is a member of the Non-Compete and Trade Secrets Group and has represented clients in sensitive and significant trade secret and employment matters.

Pietro litigates and counsels clients on matters involving employee movement between competitors, with a focus on the enforceability of restrictive covenants.

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Los Angeles’ New “Ban the Box” Ordinance Prohibits Employers From Asking Job Applicants About Their Criminal History

On December 9, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti signed the “Fair Chance Initiative” into law. The new law, also referred to as the “Ban the Box” ordinance, restricts employers in the City of Los Angeles from asking job applicants about criminal convictions until after a conditional offer of employment has been made. Although some exceptions … Continue Reading

FAQ About California’s New Law on Venue and Choice of Law in Employment Agreements

We recently blogged about Governor Brown signing S.B. 1241, which is now codified as Section 925 of the California Labor Code. The law, which affects venue and choice of law provisions in agreements entered into as a condition of employment, will begin applying to agreements entered into, modified, or extended beginning on January 1, 2017. … Continue Reading

California Broadens Its “Fair Pay Act” to Prohibit Race And Ethnicity Discrimination

Around this time last year, Section 1197.5 of the California Labor Code was amended by S.B. 358 in order to “eliminate the gender wage gap in California.” Among other things, the amendment sought to increase wage transparency and made it more difficult for employers to defend against gender-based equal pay claims. On September 30, 2016, … Continue Reading

California Prohibits Employers from Considering Juvenile Criminal Convictions

In the past, a California employer could freely inquire about and consider a job applicant’s history of criminal convictions in determining any condition of employment including hiring, promotion, or termination. Although California law prohibited employers from asking about or considering arrests or detentions that did not result in convictions, the law did not impose any restrictions regarding what types of convictions employers could ask about … Continue Reading
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