In May 2017, the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) approved new regulations regarding transgender identity and expression in the workplace. The regulations become effective July 1, 2017.

The new rules further expand the Fair Employment and Housing Act’s (FEHA) role in preventing discrimination in employment and housing on the basis of gender identity. In addition, the regulations describe some new policies that

According to reporting from the California Chamber of Commerce, several recently introduced bills have passed the California State Senate or Assembly and now move on to a vote in the second house. These bills include:

  • Assembly Bill 1209 – requires California employers with more than 250 employees to collect data on the mean and median salaries paid to men and women under the same

Matson v. UPS, 840 F.3d 1126 (9th Cir. 2016)

Mary Matson, a member of the Teamsters Union, worked as a “combination worker” unloading and sorting packages at UPS’s Boeing Field International hub in Seattle. During her employment, Matson allegedly complained that because of her gender she was subject to unfair and demeaning treatment in the workplace.  UPS subsequently fired Matson for “proven dishonesty,” relying upon

Ellis v. Costco Wholesale Corp., 657 F.3d 970 (9th Cir. 2011)

In this appeal, Costco challenged the district court’s order granting class certification in an action in which Costco’s promotional practices were alleged to have discriminated against female employees. The district court’s order granting class certification preceded the United States Supreme Court’s opinion in Wal-Mart Stores v. Dukes, 131 S. Ct. 2541 (2011).

In Ellis v. Costco Wholesale Corp., 2011 U.S. App. LEXIS 19060 (9th Cir. Sept. 16, 2011), the Ninth Circuit reviewed the standards for class certification in an employment class action following the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Dukes v. Walmart. In Ellis,three named plaintiffs sought injunctive relief, compensatory damages, and backpay on behalf of a nationwide class of female employees who the plaintiffs claimed had been denied promotion because of their gender. The district court granted class certification. In reviewing the certification order, the court provided guidance for class action litigation in the Ninth Circuit following Walmart.

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes, 131 S. Ct. 2541 (2011)

The United States Supreme Court held that this class of as many as 1.5 million current and former female Wal-Mart employees was improperly certified by the lower court. The three lead plaintiffs claimed they were discriminated against on the basis of their gender and that Wal-Mart’s policy of providing deference to local managers’ subjective

Toyota v. Superior Court, 189 Cal. App. 4th 1391 (2010)

Steven Braun sued Toyota Motor Sales and his supervisor Randall Bauer for gender discrimination, sexual harassment, defamation, constructive discharge and intentional and negligent infliction of emotional distress. Toyota and Bauer filed a motion to compel Braun to submit to an independent psychiatric examination, which the trial court granted, but it also permitted Braun’s attorney

Dukes v. Wal-Mart Stores, 603 F.3d 571 (2010) (en banc)

The district court certified a class encompassing all women employed by Wal-Mart at any time after December 26, 1998 who claimed gender discrimination under Title VII and who sought injunctive and declaratory relief, back pay and, in a separate opt-out class, punitive damages. Among other things, plaintiffs claim they received lower pay and fewer

Harvey v. Sybase, Inc., 161 Cal. App. 4th 1547 (2008)

Marietta Harvey was hired and supervised by Nita White-Ivy in the human resources departments of two different companies, including Sybase. When Sybase terminated Harvey, she alleged discrimination on the basis of race or gender. The jury agreed and returned a verdict in Harvey’s favor in the amount of $1.3 million in compensatory damages and

Jones v. California Dep’t of Corrections and Rehabilitation, 152 Cal. App. 4th 1367 (2007)

Kim C. Jones worked as a correctional officer at the R.J. Donovan Correctional Facility for approximately 16 years before experiencing alleged gender discrimination, sexual harassment, race discrimination, assault and battery and intentional and negligent infliction of emotional distress. The trial court granted summary judgment to the defendants, including her supervisors