Digital Realty Trust, Inc. v. Somers, 583 U.S. ___, 2018 WL 987345 (2018)

Paul Somers alleged that his former employer Digital Realty terminated his employment after he reported to senior management suspected securities-law violations by the company. Somers neither alerted the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) of his concerns prior to his termination nor did he file an administrative complaint within 180 days of

Somers v. Digital Realty Trust, Inc., 850 F.3d 1045 (9th Cir. 2017)

Paul Somers, who was formerly employed as a vice president of Digital Realty, alleged that he was fired after he made several reports to senior management regarding possible securities law violations. Somers did not report his concerns to the SEC. Somers sued Digital Realty for violation of Section 21F of the Securities

Lawson v. FMR LLC, 571 U.S. ___, 134 S. Ct. 1158 (2014)

Plaintiffs in this case are former employees of private companies that contract to advise or manage mutual funds (collectively, “FMR”). Both plaintiffs allege that they “blew the whistle” on putative fraud relating to the mutual funds and as a result suffered retaliation from FMR. Plaintiffs filed suit in federal court alleging violations

Coppinger-Martin v. Solis, 627 F.3d 745 (2010)

Carole Coppinger-Martin alleged that Nordstrom, Inc. violated the whistle-blower-protection provision of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“SOX”), 18 U.S.C. § 1514A, by terminating her employment in retaliation for her reporting to supervisors conduct she believed violated the rules and regulations of the SEC. The United States Department of Labor’s Administrative Review Board (“ARB”) dismissed Coppinger-Martin’s complaint as

Romaneck v. Deutsche Asset Mgmt., 2006 WL 2385237 (N.D. Cal. Aug. 17, 2006)

Lawrence Romaneck worked as the Director of Sales for Deutsche Asset Management’s West Region from 1996 to 2004. Deutsche Bank asserted that it had terminated Romaneck for his involvement in facilitating market timing by one of the company’s clients; Romaneck alleged his employment was terminated in violation of several statutes, including

SEC v. Gemstar-TV Guide Int’l, 367 F.3d 1087 (9th Cir. 2004)

As part of its announced plans to restructure its management and corporate governance, Gemstar-TV Guide entered into negotiations for termination agreements with its CEO and CFO. The CEO’s termination agreement provided for a “termination fee” of $22.45 million, an additional $7.03 million in unpaid salary, bonuses, and unused vacation and millions of shares