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Michelle Lappen is an associate in the Labor & Employment Department and a member of the Employment Litigation & Arbitration Group. She assists clients in a wide range of labor and employment matters in a variety of industries, including entertainment, financial services, and technology.

Michelle earned her J.D. from Columbia Law School, where she was an articles and submissions editor for the Columbia Journal of Law & the Arts. During law school, she also was a teaching fellow for the Advanced Negotiation Workshop and advocated for state and federal legislation as a clinical student in the Columbia Law Health Justice Advocacy Clinic.

As readers may know, California requires private employers of 100 or more employees and/or 100 or more workers hired through labor contractors to annually report pay, demographic, and other workforce data to the Civil Rights Department (“CRD”).

The CRD has published “important announcements” regarding changes to this year’s reporting requirements, including the following:

  • New data fields for remote workers: Employers must now report information

To determine the minimum rate of pay or salary threshold applicable to certain exemptions from overtime regulations under California law, the Department of Industrial Relations (“DIR”) uses the California Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (“CCPI”).  The DIR has announced the 2024 rates (effective January 1, 2024) for the computer software employee exemption and licensed physicians and surgeons exemption

For

As we previously covered here, the State of California and select California cities increased the minimum wage effective January 1, 2023.  Now, another round of minimum wage increases from a dozen localities will take effect on July 1, 2023.

The following list contains the local minimum wage rate, effective July 1, 2023, for non-exempt employees working in each of the California counties and municipalities

As we previously reported (here), California requires private employers of 100 or more employees (with at least one employee in California) to report pay and demographic data to the California Civil Rights Department (“CRD”) (formerly the Department of Fair Employment and Housing).  Senate Bill 1162 (previously covered here) enhanced California’s reporting requirements by:

  • Changing the deadline to May 10, 2023 for the

On January 13, 2023, a Sacramento County Superior Court judge issued a preliminary injunction to stop the controversial Fast Food Accountability and Standards Recovery Act or “FAST Recovery Act” (AB 257) from taking effect, pending a vote by California voters.  Previously, on December 30, 2022, the court had issued a temporary restraining order against the new law, which was signed by Gov. Newsom

In the weeks and months since it changed its name from the Department of Fair Employment and Housing to the California Civil Rights Department (“CRD”), the agency has been busy.  Most recently, the CRD released proposed modifications to the regulations under the Fair Employment and Housing Act (“FEHA”) related to the use and consideration of criminal history information in employment decisions—a process that is already

In the continuously evolving whistleblower retaliation standard we previously reported on earlier this year here and here, the Ninth Circuit has now weighed in on California Labor Code section 1102.5 in Killgore v. Specpro Pro. Serv., LLC, No. 21-15897.

In holding that a consultant on an environmental project for the U.S. Army Reserve Command raised a genuine dispute of fact over whether he

As in other sectors of the economy, there is a labor shortage in the funeral industry.  However, unlike other fields in which the demand for workers is outpacing supply, the interest in joining the ranks of the funeral services business is booming.  The American Board of Funeral Service Education (“ABFSE”), the national academic accreditation agency for college and university programs in Funeral Service and

The California Secretary of State announced on July 22, 2022 that a measure to replace the California Labor Code Private Attorneys General Act of 2004 (“PAGA”) qualified as an eligible statewide ballot measure for the November 2024 General Election ballot.  PAGA allows “aggrieved” employees to file a representative action on behalf of themselves and other “aggrieved” employees and the state of California for certain alleged